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Malaga

Tuesday

Malaga feels much bigger than the few other Spanish towns we've visited along the Mediterranean, over the past dozen years. Plenty to explore and see and do; but being after all a metropolis it seems harder to discover a definable personality here. Maybe it's a neighborhood thing, able to be appreciated only to the favored ones who live here. Below foreground is Malaga's splendid baroque cathedral, impressive by any measure.

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One thing you see everywhere, here, is stone. Slate, to be exact. Building walls and roofs, occasional paving, often intermixed with field rocks to make un-mortared walls between pastures. I love the slightly wild hominess of it. Plentiful chimney pots poke up .

Malaga's impressive cathedral appears here again. What I find remarkable is the absence of any other nearby structure that would remotely suggest the 18th century when, after 250 years, the structure was completed.

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To your right as you view this picture  90 degrees, out of view here) is a long permanent jetty that extends out into the harbor, where cruise ships tie up. So upon setting foot on terra firma after this present overnight voyage, there's a quarter-mile of concrete sidewalk to trudge along, to this marvelous little beach. Real. Sand.

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Perched on a hilltop overlooking the harbor (and as it happens, all cruise ships tied up out there), is a Moorish fort, with all its admirable Saracen architectural/comfort features, It was of course transformed into a governor's palace after the reconquista, but the beauty of it remains.

Now back onboard, sailing to

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They're Going Again!